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The top five things we love about nursing

Posted on May 7, 2018

This National Nursing Week (May 7 – 13, 2018), we at Vancouver Community College (VCC) are shining a light on this time-honoured yet ever-changing profession. Here are the top five things we love about nursing:

 

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1. Nurses literally save lives

Nurses go through a lot of studying and training; typically four years for a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BScN). The job can also be demanding, exhausting, and emotionally draining, but nurses around the world will tell you that nothing is more personally rewarding than the work they do.

“I’ve saved lives,” says VCC alumna and licensed practical nurse (LPN) Sarah-Zoe Pichette. “You go to bed knowing that you’ve been productive and you’ve been a good person every day.”

 

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2. Nursing is so many things

Just as the nursing uniform has evolved from aprons and caps to scrubs and sneakers, the profession itself has also expanded into countless areas.  

Today, nurses can specialize in psychiatry, neuroscience, community health, paediatrics, gerontology, or emergency care, to name only a few. Nurses can also choose practice settings that range from hospitals and schools to research labs, disaster sites, refugee camps, the military, and even cruise ships and resorts.  

 

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3. Nurses won't be replaced by robots

While many workers out there may be wondering if or when their jobs will be taken over by automation or artificial intelligence, nurses can rest assured they’ll always be needed. Predictions indicate that jobs requiring empathy, human interaction and dealing with unpredictability will be safest from the “robot workplace invasion.” 

 

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4. Nurses are good for our health

Nurses have a massive amount of knowledge about the human body, and it isn’t confined to their hospitals or clinics. A nurse’s knowledge and experience will naturally extend into his or her family and wider community, whether by treating scraped knees, giving nutrition advice, or even offering guidance for addiction treatment options.

“Nurses don’t just go to work and come home,” says VCC nursing instructor Sarah Desbiens. “Nurses are part of an international community of people committed to health and wellness.”

 

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5. Nursing can start (and take you) anywhere

You’re a natural caregiver, you’re not afraid of hard work, and you’re thinking of getting into nursing. What next? 

VCC’s 32-week pre-health sciences program is a combination of introductory biology, chemistry, mathematics, and other courses specifically designed to introduce learners to a wide variety of health sciences careers before they choose an individual path. 

For those already working as accredited health care assistants (HCA) or resident care attendants (RCA), VCC offers a condensed, 13-month curriculum that recognizes past training and experience while earning a Practical Nursing diploma.

Nursing doesn’t have to be a final destination, either. According to Sarah, nursing opens doors to further degrees in education, leadership, research, administration, and others. Many nurses also go on to attend medical school or law school. “Nursing is a great ticket into a great job,” says Sarah, “but it can also be a jumping-off point into so much more.”

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Read more about National Nursing Week and join us in celebrating VCC’s health care professionals.